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The Atlantic Slave Trade And British Abolition Pdf

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Dr Roger Anstey's title is slightly deceptive.

In economic terms the slave trade had become less important. There was no longer a need for large numbers of slaves to be imported to the British colonies. There was a world over-supply of sugar and British merchants had difficulties re-exporting it.

The Propaganda of Anti-Slavery

Franklin W. Knight, Roger Anstey. Atlantic Highlands, N. Most users should sign in with their email address. If you originally registered with a username please use that to sign in.

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The Propaganda of Anti-Slavery

Franklin W. Knight, Roger Anstey. Atlantic Highlands, N. Most users should sign in with their email address. If you originally registered with a username please use that to sign in. To purchase short term access, please sign in to your Oxford Academic account above. Don't already have an Oxford Academic account?

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This article reviews scholarship on the transatlantic slave trade. The foundations of a slave trade historiography date to the late eighteenth-century abolition movements in North America, Britain, and France. Before then, occasional voices sounded in protest. From to , pamphlets concerning the Royal African Company's monopoly were published in England. With the founding of the world's first antislavery crusade, antislavery advocates came to predominate among the researchers who were seeking information on the slave trade. Abolitionist energies coalesced in —9 in London with the formation of anti-slave trade committees and the subsequent British parliamentary inquiries.

The Transatlantic Slave Trade

A main cause of the trade was the colonies that European countries were starting to develop. In America, for instance, which was a colony of England, there was a demand for many labourers for the sugar, tobacco and cotton plantations. Paid labourers were too expensive, and the indigenous people had largely been wiped out by disease and conflict, so the colonisers turned to Africa to provide cheap labour in the form of slaves. The first shipment of slaves from West Africa to the Americas, across the Atlantic Ocean, was in the early s. European, Arab and African merchants were now selling humans as well as gold, ivory and spices.

We are told that we need to face up to our past, and learn from it. So we should, honestly and in full. Britain was a major participant in the slave-trade and slavery during the 18th century, but there followed years of imperial penance in the form of costly abolitionist endeavour to liberate slaves around the globe. The vicious racism of slavers and planters was not the essence of Britain or its empire, and whatever racism exists in Britain today is not its fruit.

Slavery and the natural world

Britain, Slavery, and Anti-Slavery

The Atlantic slave trade from Africa to the New World might well have been the largest maritime migration in history. The reason for this maritime movement was to obtain labour as the indigenous population of the New World had declined rapidly because of its lack of immunity against imported pathogens. In spite of the growing volume of the trade and the increasing demand for slaves, the Atlantic slave trade was abolished during the first decades of the 19th century due to humanitarian pressures. The expansion of Europe after could not have succeeded without slaves as Europeans refused to migrate in sufficient numbers to the tropics, where their death rate was extremely high.

The Act was repealed in as a part of wider rationalisation of English statute law; however, later anti-slavery legislation remains in force. In May , Lord Mansfield 's judgment in the Somersett's Case emancipated a slave in England and thus helped launch the movement to abolish slavery. However, many campaigners, including Granville Sharp , mistakenly believed that the Somerset case meant that slavery was unsupported by law in England and that no authority could be exercised on slaves entering English or Scottish soil. We have no slaves at home — Then why abroad? Slaves cannot breathe in England; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free. They touch our country, and their shackles fall.


Printed in Great Britain. OTHER REVIEWS. The Atlantic Slave Trade and British Abolition, By R. Anstey. London: Macmillan, Pp.


The History of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, vol. 1

Handler and Michael L. Tuite Jr. The bi-centenary of the British abolition of the slave trade in seems another opportunity to indulge in communal good feeling: commemorating a dramatic piece of legislation that put an end to an ethical and religious outrage and which ushered in a new way of dealing with the world at large.

Although it did not abolish the practice of slavery, it did encourage British action to press other nation states to abolish their own slave trades. Many of the supporters thought the Act would lead to the end of slavery. As British historian Martin Meredith writes, "In the decade between and , British ships made about 1, voyages across the Atlantic, landing nearly , slaves.

History in Focus

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