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The Goodli History Of The Lady Lucres Of Scene And Of Her Lover Euryalus Pdf

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Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini b. Who is Pope Pius II? He was born at Corsignano in the Sienese territory of a noble but decayed family.

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Sabina, and at last Pope Pius II. See that you despise me not, when you have attained that honour; to which Aeneas replied: I do not ask to be Pope nor yet Cardinal. But I, broke in the Emperor, see that it will be so. But had anyone told him, thirty years before, when he rode to Basel with Cardinal Capranica, penniless and without a jot of influence behind him, that the day would come when all the problems of the Church of Rome would lie heavy on his shoulders, he might well have laughed.

He made his name first at the Council of Basel as an orator, and as one of the bitterest and most persuasive of the enemies of Pope Eugenius IV. He was a prolific writer upon many subjects, always in Latin, and prided himself especially on his verse, for which Frederick crowned him Poet Laureate. Years later, the Pope would have suppressed this indiscretion of his youth, and failed: it was a best seller. This was, however, about the last indiscretion that Aeneas permitted himself.

Already the tone of his letters was changing, and in he wrote to a friend that he had received a benefice, and would soon be ordained. He could see, by this time, that his career pointed to the Church, and the part he played in the Diet of Frankfurt settled it. He was now a man of some importance in Europe, but he had gained his position as a defender of the Church; it was as a churchman he must maintain it. Besides, other changes had been taking place. The poverty and hardship of his youth, as well as his ineradicable habit of burning the candle at both ends, had told upon his health.

At forty, he was bald and old beyond his years. I don't deny it, dearest John, but time slips away, day by day; we are older, the day of our death draws near, and now we must consider not how to live, but how to die For me, John, I have sinned enough, and too much. Now I know myself, and may it not be too late. For now I am forty, and the day of salvation, the time for repentance is at hand When he was Pope, he still must mourn that people would not forget Aeneas for Pius. The young man had made too deep an impression for the old one to erase it, and even now the metamorphosis must be explained as either hypocrisy or senile decay.

For those that have passed their life in piety and lived safely do not like to think that the adventurer and the libertine may also, at the end, know the spiritual joys for which they have sacrificed all the rest. While those who admire the young and dashing Aeneas, the sceptical author of the Tale of Two Lovers , despise him for his betrayal of himself, seeing in his belated piety the signs of a weakening mind.

Old age, they say, and failing strength brought out the mediaeval strain latent in his youth, and certainly Aeneas was, in some measure, mediaeval. The two ages met in him, and he reminds us at times rather of a highly successful wandering scholar than a man of the Renaissance. The Lucretia of his love-story is a perfect product of the new attitude towards life. For my part, while I read, I loved you the more, perceiving that to your great beauty and honesty was added learning. In youth he loved and adventured, studied and made a name; delighting in his wits and in his body, denying neither.

In the middle years, he turned his thoughts to his future, in this world and the next. And at the end he filled his high position as nobly as he knew how. Its author was Aeneas Sylvius, the layman. The bishop, the Cardinal, and the Pope, enemy incarnate of the Infidel, have nothing to do with Lucretia and Euryalus. Pius II. Do you know the kind of man he is? You will be surprised when I describe him. For nature has grudged him nothing, except beauty. He is a dwarf. He should have belonged to my family, that has the name of little men.

The fellow is eloquent and skilled in either kind of law; knows all the histories; has practised poetry. He can write a song in Latin or Italian; knows as much about philosopby as Plato; in geometry a very Boethius; in arithmetic another Macrobius; there is not a musical instrument be cannot play; he understands agriculture with Virgil and has studied every branch of politics. While his body was still young and strong, he was a second Entellus, a master-wrestler.

In running, leaping, or boxing, be could not be surpassed. Sometimes the elements of small bodies are the more precious, as gems and jewels testify. But, among mortals, none has drawn every lot. I have not yet known anyone who lacked less than he. Why, he has studied even the most trifling things. He paints like Apelles; nothing could be more faultless or clearer than the codices written by his hand; in sculpture a second Praxiteles, and no mean physician.

Add to that moral virtues, ruling and directing the rest. I have, in my time, known many that studied literature and were also rich in pupils, but they lacked the civic qualities, and knew nothing about managing affairs, public or domestic.

Paglarensis gaped, and accused his steward of theft who told him that one ass travailed for a single foal, while his sow had a litter of eleven. Bonitius of Milan thought he was with child and long went in fear of a delivery, because his wife had mounted him. Yet these men were considered the chief light of the law.

In others too, you will find arrogance or greed: my friend is all generosity. His house is ever full of honest company. His face is rather socratic, and always the same.

In adversity, he maintains a brave heart, and no good fortune can puff him up. He has some experience of guile, not in practising but in shunning it. Dear to his townsfolk, beloved of travellers; none hate him, none resent him. Now, why a man of such great virtue should ask so frivolous a thing, I know not. But this I know; for me to refuse him anything were wrong. For while I lived in Siena, I loved him strangely; nor has my love grown less, although he is far away. And so I felt I might not spurn his requests, and I have written the adventure of two lovers: nor have I invented it.

For this thing took place in Siena, when the Emperor Sigismund was living there. You too were there and, if my ears have heard aright, made work for love. It is the city of Venus. And men who knew you tell how fiercely you burned, and that none was more passionate than you. As they think, no amatory adventure there befell, but you knew of it. Wherefore, I pray you, read this history, and see if I have told it aright.

And do not be ashamed to recollect, if ever anything of this kind happened to you; for you too were a man. He who has never truly felt the flames of love is but a stone, or a beast.

It is no secret that into the very marrow-bones of the Gods has crept the fiery particle. You ask a thing ill-suited to my years, to yours both offensive and disgusting. For how can it become me, who am near forty, to write of love, or you, that are in your fifties, to read of it That is a subject which delights young minds, and demands a tender heart. Old men are as fitted to tales of love as young men are to tales of prudence.

Nor is there anything uglier than old age pursuing love, but lacking strength. Indeed I know, to write of love does not beseem me, who have already passed the noonday of life and am carried on towards evening; but it dishonours you who ask no less than me who write.

I must give way to you; do you consider, then, what you ask. For as you are the elder, so should you the more honestly observe the laws of friendship. So many are the favours I owe to you, I can deny you nothing, not even when it involves some measure of disgrace. Therefore I will grant your request, now some ten times repeated, nor longer refuse what you demand so uproariously.

For who is there so worthless as would lie, when he can shelter himself behind the truth? Because you have been many times in love, nor yet lack fire, you wish me to weave for you the story of two lovers.

It is an evil that will not let you grow old. Nor shall I imagine, who have such a store of truth. For what, in all the world, is more common than love? What state, what little town, what family lacks examples? I conjecture from myself whom love has sent into a thousand perils, and I thank the Gods above that I have a thousand times escaped the ambushes prepared for me; more fortunate in my star than Mars whom Vulcan took with Venus, and caught them in an iron net, and displayed them, as a laughing-stock, to the other Gods.

But I shall touch on other loves than mine, lest as I rake the ashes of some old fire, I find a spark still burning. You will not hear the loves of Troy or Babylon, but of our own city; though, of the lovers, one was born under a northern sky.

Perhaps, even from this, some profit may be drawn. For, while the lady that comes into this tale, lost her lover, and, amid lamentations, breathed out her sad, indignant spirit; he too, from that time, never had any part in true happiness: and this will be a kind of warning to the young, to shun such trifles. So let all maidens attend and, profiting by this adventure, see to it that the loves of young men send them not to their perdition.

And this story teaches youths not to arm themselves for the warfare of love, which is more bitter than sweet; but, putting away passion, which drives men mad, to pursue the study of virtue, for she alone can make her possessor happy. While, if there is anyone that does not know from other sources how many evils love conceals, he may learn from this. For you, farewell, and listen closely to the tale you compel me to write.

Here begins the Tale of the Two Lovers THE city of Siena, your native town and mine, did great honour to the Emperor Sigismund on his arrival, as is now well known; and a palace was made ready for him by the church of Saint Martha, on the road that leads to the narrow gate of sandstone. As Sigismund came hither, after the ceremonies, he met four married ladies, for birth and beauty, age and ornament, almost equal.

All thought them goddesses rather than mortal women, and had they been only three, they might have seemed those whom Paris, we are told, saw in a dream. Now Sigismund, though advanced in years, was quick to passion; he took great pleasure in the company of women, and loved feminine caresses.

Indeed he liked nothing better than the presence of great ladies.

The Two Lovers: The Goodly History Of Lady Lucrece And Her Lover Eurialus

Sabina, and at last Pope Pius II. See that you despise me not, when you have attained that honour; to which Aeneas replied: I do not ask to be Pope nor yet Cardinal. But I, broke in the Emperor, see that it will be so. But had anyone told him, thirty years before, when he rode to Basel with Cardinal Capranica, penniless and without a jot of influence behind him, that the day would come when all the problems of the Church of Rome would lie heavy on his shoulders, he might well have laughed. He made his name first at the Council of Basel as an orator, and as one of the bitterest and most persuasive of the enemies of Pope Eugenius IV. He was a prolific writer upon many subjects, always in Latin, and prided himself especially on his verse, for which Frederick crowned him Poet Laureate. Years later, the Pope would have suppressed this indiscretion of his youth, and failed: it was a best seller.

Emily O'Brien and Kenneth R. Publications of the Barnabe Riche Society. Ottawa, Canada: Dovehouse Edi-tions, ISBN The Two Lovers. Edited with notes and introductions by K. Bartlett and E.

Ottawa: Dovehouse Editions, For Gaspar was the Euryalus of Aeneas' tale; he had visited Italy with the The Lucretia of his love-story is a perfect product of the new attitude towards life. Lucres of It is a tale of unlawful love, and tells how Lucrece, a married lady of Sienna, fell in love with Eurialus, a knight of the court of Of the inholders wife and her ii lovers. The Rape of Lucrece is a narrative poem by William Shakespeare about the legendary. He also threatens to cause her dishonor by murdering a slave and placing the two bodies in each other s arms,. Lucres of "It is a tale of unlawful love, and tells how Lucrece, a married lady of Sienna, fell in love with Eurialus, a knight of the court of Of the inholders wife and her ii lovers.

The Two Lovers: The Goodly History Of Lady Lucrece And Her Lover Eurialus

Но если она окажется впереди, он подставит Стратмору спину. Волоча Сьюзан за собой, он использовал ее как живой щит. Преодолев треть ступенек, он почувствовал какое-то движение у подножия лестницы. Стратмор что-то задумал. - И не пытайтесь, коммандер, - прошипел .

В XVI11 веке некий английский купец приобрел у севильской церкви три десятка бушелей апельсинов и, привезя их в Лондон, обнаружил, что фрукты горькие и несъедобные. Он попытался сделать из апельсиновой кожуры джем, но чтобы можно было взять его в рот, в него пришлось добавить огромное количество сахара. Так появился апельсиновый мармелад. Халохот пробирался между деревьями с пистолетом в руке.

Ей казалось, что она слышит его голос, зовущий ее, заставляющий спасаться бегством, но куда ей бежать. Шифровалка превратилась в наглухо закрытую гробницу. Но это теперь не имело никакого значения, мысль о смерти ее не пугала.

Он спрятал свой ключ, зашифровав его формулой, содержащейся в этом ключе.

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И снова Стратмор нетерпеливым взмахом руки заставил ее замолчать. Сьюзан в испуге взглянула на Хейла. Он стоял с безучастным видом, словно происходящее его никак не касалось. И это понятно, - подумала.  - Никакой вирус Хейла не волнует, он ведь отлично знает, что происходит с ТРАНСТЕКСТОМ. Но Чатрукьян стоял на. - Зараженный файл существует, сэр.

Он должен был знать, что случится, если АНБ не получит кольцо, - и все же в последние секунды жизни отдал его кому-то. Он не хотел, чтобы оно попало в АНБ. Но чего еще можно было ждать от Танкадо - что он сохранит кольцо для них, будучи уверенным в том, что они-то его и убили. И все же Сьюзан не могла поверить, что Танкадо допустил бы. Ведь он был пацифистом и не стремился к разрушению.

1 Comments

Eliora R. 14.06.2021 at 19:36

One night, after conducting the two ladies to the oppra, after suppink of white soop, sammy-deperdrow, and shampang glassy which means eyced , at their house in the plas vandom, me and master droav hoam in the cab, as happy as possbill.

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